New bill aims to make digital ID pervasive in the U.S.

Rep. Bill Foster (D-IL) has reintroduced the “Improving Digital Identity Act,” (H.R. 4258 ) a bipartisan bill that would increase the federal government’s involvement in the digital identity ecosystem. The bill is set to be approved by the House Committee on Oversight and Reform.

The bill seeks to require the federal government to use its authority to help citizens “prove who they are online” through the provision of optional ID validation services, which “augment private sector digital identity and authentication solutions.”

The bill would also require the creation of a task force on digital identity and a grant program at the DHS to support the development of interoperable identity verification systems at the local and state levels. A similar bill was introduced in the Senate by Sens. Cynthia Lummis (R-WY) and Krysten Sinema (D-AZ).

In a press release, Senator Lummis (WY)said that “it doesn’t make sense that Americans have to constantly overshare sensitive identity information with government agencies and businesses, which are honeypots all too often targeted by hackers and identity thieves.”

The bill in the Senate has a few differences from the original one introduced in the House. The one in the Senate insists that access to digital ID verification should be equitable.

Digital ID Will be locking down your freedom of movement based upon “Biosafety” and cementing the CBDC social Credit system

“When they are finally established, U.S. digital IDs will likely be based on smartphones and biometrics,” U.S. Congressman Bill Foster, the author said in an ID2020 webinar.

Foster discussed the need for secure digital identity to back a wide range of services, including any digital immunity certificates that might be established.

“Central bank digital assets and digital currencies will significantly drive digital identity efforts in the coming years”,Foster said noting that the most secure blockchain in the world has no value for this type of application if people are operating on it with fraudulent identities.

The “underbanked population” within the U.S. has also gained attention due to the challenges posed distributing pandemic stimulus payments, and Foster suggests the U.S. is more sensitive to the need for digital identity to help address anti money-laundering (AML) and corruption concerns than it has been in the past. (Establishing Direct control of how and when you get allotted money, and how and when you can access it)

“Biometrics are going to play a huge role in all of this,” Foster notes.The combination of each individual’s smartphone and biometrics will provide defense against identity fraud, and the impressive technology continues to improve, Foster said.

Sources: Reclaim the Net

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