Apple and Biometrics: Iphone 5S is Big Brother’s Ideal Surveillance Tool

biometricprintID

The wireless age has grown leaps and bounds since the turn of the new millennium. From big square cellphones, to flip phones, to the new touch screen phones that can access the Internet wherever service is available. However, communications just went ‘Back to the Future’; 1984 to be exact, and was secretly given over to Big Brother.

Apple’s new iPhone 5s will come in many(pretty,distracting) colors, and with a brand new feature; Touch ID. Touch ID uses biometrics technology so users can scan their fingerprints to better lock their phones. The latest series of Apple’s iPhone will not only continue to cultivate numerous apps that track your location through GPS and transmit data directly back to corporations and government, but contain a fingerprint sensor that stores your fingerprint in order to purchase apps and unlock the phone for use. For most, this seemingly harmless feature is just that; harmless. But for privacy advocates, and those who understand the direction we are heading in, our biggest fears were realized.

And that’s really just the beginning. As millions will most likely continue through the Apple food chain and purchase this phone, the NSA and bloated federal government at large will be beyond ecstatic. Because after all, it’s a real dream come true for the Big Daddy government spy state.

No longer will you actually need to be arrested to gather your fingerprints — we’re talking about millions nationwide willingly submitting their biometrics to a database that most certainly is accessible by Apple and big government.

Of course Apple claims that the fingerprint scans will be ‘local’ on your hardware, but of course the NSA and FBI would not let such a precious database go to waste. And we already know that corporations are making big bucks spying on the data of consumers.

Biometric-security-Smartphone-946x1024

In the digital age, wireless technology, and biometrics are increasingly becoming one. It should be no surprise that Apple was the first to get their hands on the biometrics technology and incorporate it into its new phone. Your phone is now a wireless world in and of itself, where Big Brother has his hands on the pulse. Cell phones can scan Q codes, swipe credit cards, and now read your own, unique fingerprints. This is building to the new age: the age of a cashless society.

When everything from books, to bank transactions are carried out over the Internet, this enables governments to censor, delete, manage, and monitor an individual’s trends. People should wake up to the fact that although the technology has a potential for being great, the current political and governmental system, mixed with the path we are on, is a powder keg of nefarious snooping, spying, information databasing, and outright theft.

As we inch towards a world in which our electronics are based around biometrics, it becomes an eery reality that our Big Daddy, Big Brother system is continually holding our hands as we walk right into the current spy system that our overlords continue to assert does not exist.

Read More: Activist Post

Read More: Zen Haven

Corporate Spying on citizens

burgspy

Governments aren’t the only ones spying on citizens, the lesser known aspects of the total surveillance society are in the area of corporate spying.

Shell, Nestle, Monsanto and McDonald’s Have Biggest Private Spy Outfits

Just as governments spy on activists, so do corporations. In an interview, investigative reporter Eveline Lubbers is asked which corporations have the most extensive intelligence-gathering operations. The answer ( via Parapolitical.com: In Secret Manoeuvres in the Dark you detail policies of cooperation between state security services and corporate security in monitoring the activities of activist and pressure groups. In your research were you able to identify two or three nations and corporations that might, in your opinion, be the “worst” offenders?

LUBBERS: In my book, the worst offenders in Secret Manoeuvres are Shell, Nestlé and Monsanto. And McDonald’s to a lesser extent. Corporations under fire for many reasons, and for many years. My research depends on the availability of sources, whistleblowers, leaks or court transcripts.

The present corporate counterstrategies go back to the early 1970s, and in the UK to the Thatcher days, with corporations today building on the similar plans developed back in the days by those in PR and risk management. The networks of police and intelligence personnel now working in security for corporations or in consultancy is more than an old boy network exchanging information. The blurring boundaries give way to a joint network with a similar agenda of increasing power while getting rid of risk factors like boycotts or other political barriers.

Read more of the article Here