Drivers Licenses becoming a resource for Police Facial recognition Databases

facedatabasepolice

Law enforcement agencies are building what critics say is becoming a de facto national, searchable database of ID photos — with pictures of both those with and without a criminal past — that uses state driver’s licence photos as a foundation.

The facial databases have grown rapidly in recent years and generally operate with few legal safeguards beyond the requirement that searches are conducted for “law enforcement purposes.” Amid rising concern about the National Security Agency’s high-tech surveillance aimed at foreigners, it is these state-level facial-recognition programs that more typically involve American citizens.

Such open access has caused a backlash in some of the few states where there has been a public debate. As the databases grow larger and increasingly connected across jurisdictional boundaries, critics warn that authorities are developing what amounts to a national identification system — based on the distinct geography of each human face.

Sources: The Verge
Washington Post

Over 200 Million People Are in the US Facial Recognition Database

facerecogpeople

You are probably participating in the facial recognition database whether you want to or not. Most likely, your visage is there to be easily identified, without your consent, even if you’ve never committed a crime.

Using the vague criteria of “law enforcement purposes”, the United States has more than 200 million Americans filed away in various facial recognition databases. If you have a driver’s license or any other government photo ID, your face is probably one of them.

According to the (Propaganda..oops) Washington Post:

Law enforcement use of such facial searches is blurring the traditional boundaries between criminal and non-criminal databases, putting images of people never arrested in what amount to perpetual digital lineups. The most advanced systems allow police to run searches from laptop computers in their patrol cars and offer access to the FBI and other federal authorities.

Facial-recognition technology is part of a new generation of biometric tools that once were the stuff of science fiction but are increasingly used by authorities around the nation and the world. Though not yet as reliable as fingerprints, these technologies can help determine identity through individual variations in irises, skin textures, vein patterns, palm prints and a person’s gait while walking.

The Supreme Court’s approval this month of DNA collection during arrests coincides with rising use of that technology as well, with suspects in some cases submitting to tests that put their genetic details in official data­bases, even if they are never convicted of a crime.

it isn’t only our driver’s licenses that we have to worry about. Another, even larger, database exists. The US State Department has a database with 230 million searchable images. Anyone with a passport or an immigration visa may find themselves an unwilling participant in this database.
This invasion of privacy is just another facet of the surveillance state, and should be no surprise considering the information Edward Snowden just shared about the over-reaching tentacles of the NSA into all of our communications. We are filing our identities with the government and they can identify us at will, without any requirement for probable cause.

Via Red Ice Creations

The Terrifying Future of The United States

The development of a Fascist Police State is happening right before our eye’s. Will we ignore it(E.G Nazi Germany 1930’s) or will we use the information at our disposal, to defeat theses plans?

Supreme Court: Police can collect DNA swabs from arrests

the-government-wants-your-dna

In a major victory for law enforcement agencies(Read:Collection agents for the unofficial DNA database), the Supreme Court on Monday ruled that police can take a DNA sample from someone who has been arrested and charged but not convicted of a crime.

By a 5-4 vote the court reversed a decision last April by Maryland’s highest court that overturned the 2010 conviction and life sentence of Alonzo Jay King for a rape committed seven years earlier.

The court, in an opinion written by Justice Anthony Kennedy, handed a victory to the state of Maryland by saying taking of DNA samples was similar to taking fingerprints. DNA samples can be taken if police have probable cause to detain a suspect facing charges relating to a serious offense, Kennedy said.

Like fingerprints, DNA is used for identification, and is not by itself evidence of a crime, Kennedy said. There is a legitimate government interest in knowing the identity of the person arrested, he added.

Via Dark Government

One Step closer to a DNA Database

scaliadnadescision

*In dissent, Justice Antonin Scalia explained that taking DNA samples of individuals arrested to set up a genetic database under the guise of solving cold cases in the distant future is an affront to the 4th Amendment.

Scalia said: “Make no mistake about it: because of today’s decision, your DNA can be taken and entered into a national database if you are ever arrested, rightly or wrongly, and for whatever reason.”

* From Occupy Corporatism

Human cloning could start within 50 years

Sir John Gurdon, the British scientist whose work cloning frogs in the 1950s and 60s led to the creation of Dolly the sheep by Edinburgh scientists in 1996, said human cloning could happen within half a century.

The biologist who won this year’s Nobel prize thinks that while any attempt to clone a human would raise complex ethical issues, people would soon overcome their concerns if the technique became medically useful.

He explained that in-vitro fertilisation was regarded with considerable suspicion when it was first developed but became widely accepted after the birth of Louise Brown, the first ‘test tube baby’, in 1978.

Speaking on BBC Radio Four’s The Life Scientific, the biologist said he had predicted at the time of his frog experiments that the successful cloning of a mammal would happen within 50 years, and that and that the same answer could be applied to human cloning today

I said: “Well, it could be anywhere between 10 years and 100 years – how about 50 years?” It turned out that wasn’t far off the mark as far as Dolly was concerned. Maybe the same answer is appropriate.’

I wouldn’t doubt that the science behind this is already very advanced, could this be the impetus behind the fact that governments all over the world are creating DNA Databases. Along with attempts to gather the DNA of world leaders. could there be a concerted Genetic engineering project in the works?

Original Article Here