A National ID Card Is in the Works. ID will be required to Travel “Freely”

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The Department of Homeland Security released updated information regarding the national identification card known as the REAL ID. Beginning January 22, 2018, all airline passengers will need identification cards that are in compliance with the more secure features required by the REAL ID Act of 2005. The REAL ID Act was passed in response to the 9/11 attacks, as part of the global War on Terror.

Until this deadline, all state driver’s licenses and passports will be valid for airline travel. Currently, five states and one territory – Illinois, Minnesota, Missouri, New Mexico, Washington and American Samoa – do not comply with Real ID standards. Several other states are reportedly taking steps to update their identification cards between now and the deadline.

Travelers in states that do not comply with the stricter security measures will be forced to use an alternative form of identification recognized by the Transportation Security Administration. These options include a permanent resident card,and an airline-issued identification. Most unnerving of all is the fact that the REAL ID requirements extend to driving privileges in addition to airline travel. That’s right. If your state driver’s license does not meet REAL ID standards, you will need to carry another acceptable form of identification, and likely will not be able to legally drive.

When announcing the new guidelines, Jeh Johnson, Secretary of Homeland Security, offered a firm call to states that would dare challenge the federal government’s plan. “Over the next two years, those states that are not REAL ID compliant are strongly encouraged to meet the requirements of the law for the benefit of their residents,” Johnson told USA Today.

The history of the implementation of the REAL ID Act has been plagued with controversy and resistance from the public, politicians, and civil liberty advocates. Quite simply, this identification card is just another step towards a technocratic control grid wielded by power-hungry politicians who have little interest in stopping terrorism, but rather, controlling and dominating the population at large. It will be interesting to see which states stand their ground against the federal government — and which ones cower in fear.

Each of us has to decide what we are willing to accept in order to participate in airline travel. Perhaps for some, it is less time-consuming to simply update your identification card to comply with the proper REAL ID security measures. Others may feel strongly about their principles and will willingly accept extra harassment if it means not obtaining a national identification card.

For many of the awakened minds across America, this represents a breaking point. Will we be forced to accept the latest attack in a long line of affronts on our privacy and freedom of movement? Will we stand strong together and find ways to fight back against the increasingly tyrannical demands of the United States government?

Via The AntiMedia

New TSA rules say passengers cannot fly without a biometric ID card

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The ability to travel in the United States is about to become more restrictive as the TSA announces it will soon be enforcing new identification standards in American airports.

Beginning in 2016, passengers attempting to pass through a federal TSA checkpoint will be subject to the requirements of the REAL ID Act. To that end, the TSA will put higher scrutiny on travelers’ identities, and will only accept a federal passport or a “REAL-ID” card, which is issued by the states to meet federal requirements. Passengers will not be allowed to fly through an American airport without submitting to the advanced federal specifications.

Both federal passports and REAL-ID cards require a number of unique personal identifiers to be stored together in government databases, including his or her full name, date of birth, Social Security Number, scanned signature, and other identifiers. Both cards require biometric data: a front-facing digital photograph of the passenger’s face, which is ultimately used with a facial recognition database.

ORIGIN OF ‘REAL ID’

The enhanced security measures stem from the passage of the REAL ID Act of 2005, a U.S. law enacted by President Bush that states that a Federal agency may not accept state-issued identification cards without complying with a number of enhanced standards of the REAL ID Act.The states were given a number of years to comply, and many moved to pass their own laws to meet the benchmarks of the REAL ID Act.

According to the Department of Homeland Security, only Arizona, Idaho, Louisiana, Maine, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New York, and American Samoa have not met REAL ID standards as of January 2015. By DHS estimates, 70%-80% of all U.S. drivers are already carrying around REAL ID cards or live in states that have received extensions for compliance.

Some states have even gone as far as to require the applicant to present birth certificates, W-2 tax forms, bank statements, and/or pay stubs to verify one’s identity before handing out the new REAL-ID cards. Some cards have RFID chips embedded in them.Among the 39 benchmarks of the REAL ID Act, state ID cards have to be scannable with a bar code reader, and the states are required to share access to an electronic database with all other states.

Once DHS begins enforcing the REAL ID standards, Americans without a compliant state ID will be effectively prohibited from flying at a commercial airport. Passengers would need to obtain passports even to fly on planes that never leave the United States.

REAL ID cards streamline the process for the centralization and federalization of our private biometric data, while offering very little true benefit. In the words of Congressman Ron Paul, the program “offers us a false sense of greater security at the cost of taking a gigantic step toward making America a police state.”

Via Police State USA

Martial Law in America,More Than Just Your Papers, Please

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By (Eric Peters)

Do we live in a police state? What other state forces non-criminals to submit to fingerprinting in order to obtain permission to drive? Or merely to exist? The state of Texas does. So do the states of California, Georgia and Colorado. Soon, the entire United States is likely to require it. Indeed, already does – under the auspices of the REAL ID Act.

Under the USA Patriot Act the state of Michigan (and other states) requires over-the-road truckers not merely to be fingerprinted but also that they submit to a background check once every four years, if they wish to be able to transport “hazardous” materials.

How does all this make you feel? Free?

The state will claim that forcing people to queue up like cons and submit to being “inked” is merely (here it comes) for their own good. To protect them against identity fraud and so on. But what has this to do with driving?

So, this idea that one can opt-out of being fingerprinted by electing not to get the state’s permission to drive is preposterous. It is akin to demanding that people either submit to fingerprinting in order to use a computer (or a telephone) or give up using computers or telephones. No, it’s worse than that. Because it is feasible – though difficult – to live without a computer or a phone. It is not feasible to live without a government ID.

Original Article Here